SNAP works for us all

Logo via USDAgov on Flickr, used under a Creative Commons license (CC BY 2.0)

In the latest piece of reporting to come from FERN, Christopher D. Cook examines the current debates and impending cuts facing the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. He writes,

In September, just two days after a Census Bureau report showed that food stamps helped keep 4 million Americans out of poverty last year, the US House of Representatives approved a $39 billion cut to the program (known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP) over the next decade….

Although the Republican-controlled House cuts are unlikely, given a promised veto from President Obama, food stamps will still be slashed by $5 billion on Nov. 1, when the 2009 Recovery Act that increased the aid along with other stimulus spending expires. The 13.6 percent temporary boost in food stamp dollars helped more than half a million Americans escape food insecurity, and millions more to climb out of poverty—4.7 million in 2011 alone, according the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP).

He goes on to consider ways that the SNAP program benefits more than just direct recipients. As he summarizes,

Extensive research shows food stamps are a highly effective investment delivering big returns for all Americans, not just the poor. SNAP not only provides an economic and nutritional lifeline for low-income Americans, it also creates a significant boon to the wider economy.

For all the details, plus some great infographics (by Jaeah Lee) and tons of links, head here to Mother Jones.

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